Millennials or Generation Z, More Likely to Believe in Horoscopes Than an ‘All-Knowing’ God, Survey Shows

The United States is undergoing a “seismic worldview shift” driven by younger Americans, according to a new study by Arizona Christian University’s Cultural Research Centre, which found that Millennials are more likely to believe in horoscopes than in an “all-knowing” God.

The report, released this month, is part of the center’s 2021 American Worldview Inventory, an annual report that examines the spiritual beliefs of Americans.

The report says Millennials or Generation Z, (those born between 1984-2002) are leading much of the change. At the time of the survey, the age range of Millennials was 18 to 36.

The survey found that 35 percent of Millennials and 32 percent of Gen-Xers say they “personally receive guidance from” horoscopes,” compared to 10 percent of Boomers and 3 percent of Builders.

By comparison, only 31 percent of Millennials say they believe “God is the all-knowing, all-powerful, just creator of the universe” and “still rules it today.” That’s less than Gen-Xers (47 percent), Boomers (57 percent) and Builders (64 percent).

Meanwhile, Millennials are more than twice as likely to believe in karma (66 percent) than in an all-knowing God.

“Gen X and the Millennials have solidified dramatic changes in the nation’s central beliefs and lifestyles,” said George Barna, director of research for the Cultural Research Center. “The result is a culture in which core institutions, including churches, are continually being radically redefined.”

Among other findings:

– 51 percent of Millennials believe “reincarnation is a very real possibility.” That’s more than Gen-Xers (39 percent), Boomers (29 percent) and Builders (20 percent).

– 40 percent of Millennials affirm that “human beings were created by God in His image but are fallen creatures in need of redemption by Jesus Christ.” Gen-Xers (57 percent), Boomers (65 percent) and Builders (60 percent) are far more likely to affirm the statement.

The survey also found that Millennials are more likely than older Americans to define success in terms of personal happiness, to see premarital sex as morally acceptable, and to embrace liberal positions on social and fiscal issues, according to the Cultural Research Centre.

A press release said the nation is undergoing a “seismic worldview shift driven by younger Americans, especially Millennials.”

“As a Christian university president for the past decade and veteran of cultural battles for more than 35 years, I’ve seen dramatic evidence of this shift,” said Arizona Christian University President Len Munsil. “I believe now more than ever that we’re in desperate need of an awakening – and a biblical worldview revolution.” Mr Munsil concluded.